ALWAYS GRINDING!!

ALWAYS GRINDING!!
MORE INTERVIEWS THAN BARBERA WALTERS

Sunday, May 19, 2019

FIVE STAR CROOKS INTERVIEW

Introduce yourself and your band and tell us why we should listen to you?

I’m Rich Anderson, guitarist and contributing songwriter with Australian rock band ‘Five Star Crooks’. We’ve been around in one way or another since the mid 90’s, and despite the sad state of affairs with rock ‘n’ roll these days, our passion for playing music has never wavered. At our core we just love getting together in our jam-room, creating that roaring sound and getting the music up through our feet, creating, sharing a whisky and having a yak into the wee hours. It’s a great escape from everyday life, we’re more like family than a band, any gigs and airplay are an added bonus. Coming from the country areas outlying Melbourne city we’re essentially out on the rock and roll frontier, large distances between towns & gigs, sparse population, south of us there’s the island of Tasmania then next stop is Antarctica. The rough diamond landscape of Australia is reflected in Aussie rock music, its rough and raw, but its genuine, and that’s what you get with us. We’re more or less adopting the old jazz band attitude – if you don’t like it, frankly we don’t give a damn. It makes sense to us, we enjoy making our music and while we’ve got two feet and a heart beat we’ll keep playing. If you do like it, get on-board and join our gang, the more the merrier.

What do you classify your sound as? Who do you tell people you sound like?

Five Star Crooks play rock in the hard rock vein, raw rock ‘n’ roll. We don’t hide our influences. You can hear a lot of 70’s Aussie hard rock influence in our music, from bands such as AC/DC, The Angels, Rose Tattoo, Billy Thorpe & the Aztecs. There’s also some British influence there too from bands such as The Rolling Stones, Free, Faces, Status Quo and The Who.

With digital music in today’s world would you vote to keep or eliminate physical media?

I’d vote to keep physical media, 100%. Take me back to the 70’s, 80’s, 90’s. I grew up in an era when you had somewhere physical to go to buy music and we’d go there often. Even if you didn’t know a band, if the album artwork was eye-catching enough you might give them a go, and now and then you’d hit the jackpot. Cd’s didn’t really cut it in terms of physical appeal, not like LP covers, especially the gatefold albums, sometimes they were works of art in themselves. I’ve still got most of my teenage albums. Some were stolen or never returned. Even if they put a download card with a LP size cover or attach a usb to a LP size cover, I’d go for that over and above a digital download alone. Music product used to be a mix of art and music, I used to buy band posters frequently too. Now-days its tending to become mainly just the music, which is a loss in my eyes.



What is the reason you decided to be a musician and has that reason paid off?

I’ve been captivated by music from the get-go. I remember when I was young family would sing along around the piano at my grandparent’s hotel, and also watching guitarists perform there. Jumping around in the bedroom to the radio hits of the time pretending a tennis racket was a guitar. When I reached teenage years after I started learning guitar, music was my refuge, and I don’t think I would have survived my teens without it. I pretty much lived in my room for about two years just playing guitar and my favourite music. Playing in a band can be hard at times but you have some damn good times along the way which balances it out and makes it worthwhile. I’d say it was absolutely worth it for all the good times, the refuge that music can give and that fact that I’m still here.

How do you feel about females in metal getting special attention? Do you feel it is fair?

I wasn’t aware they were getting special attention. If you’re talking about appearance, if they’ve got it and they flaunt it good for them. If the music is not good they probably won’t last anyway, and if the music is good, what’s the issue?

Are you opposed to religious beliefs or politics being used in music?

We believe in freedom of speech, and that people can write about whatever they like. Our song Karma Take a Vengeance has a political verse set to rock n roll. Give it a Try off the new album is also political in that it asks politicians to walk a mile in the worker’s shoes.

We have dived into some pretty deep issues here. Do you think your music sends a message and if so what is it?

Every song has its own meaning or meanings, sometimes people read their own meaning in other people’s songs. I think rock music in general taps into the animal or primal in us, into the tribal and into the part of us that celebrates and knows freedom. I like to think our music is part of that.

The market has changed and many bands believe that record labels are a thing of the past, with many labels now charging bands to “sign” how do you think a band can make I in today’s scene?

Grabbing the attention of the public is the key to breaking through. There’s so much talent and entertainment out there that a band has to compete with. All you can do is try to have quality PR, keep plugging away and put your best foot forward – that and cross your fingers.

How do you feel about pay to play? Do you think it is fair for a band to have to pay money to play?

Hall’s have always had to be hired to put on an event. For a club though that’s open regularly and has music as its drawcard to be charging bands to play, I think that’s absurd. Fair enough if they have regular large rock ready audiences for touring bands to play to, but if they expect you to bring your own crowds and pay to play I think that borders on exploitation.

It is fact that you are talent and the entertainment. Explain what you think is the most important key to success.

From what I’ve read the key to success in the music business is believing in yourself, staying true to yourself, persistence and being respectful to audiences and fans. These days the chances are there is people equal or better in talent than yourself in the audience, the days of enormous ego’s in rock music are over.

In country music and even in some cases rock music is written and performed by different people. Would your band perform a song written by someone else?

Absolutely, if the song was suited to our band, and we could feel and transmit the energy of the song we’d be open to recording it. There are two songs that were written by friends of ours that we enjoy playing and may be recording in the future.

If you are pro female in music are you pro using sex to sell music?

As far as I know the term ‘rock and roll’ is a reference to sex in itself so naturally I’m not opposed to using sex to sell music as long as you have the consent of the people appearing in the promotion, the promotion is targeted responsibly, and its not degrading to women or men in general. Like I said earlier I think some forms of music and certainly rock music taps into what’s primal in us and sex is a part of that. I don’t think western civilization is sexually repressed, nor should it be.

What is your view on the lawsuits against people saying lewd or unprofessional things to women or men and how does that affect an art described as sex, drugs and rock n roll?

It depends on what is meant by lewd in the question. If the language in question is crude, degrading and abusive you can see where some people might take offence, but if ‘lewd’ is meant to refer to a pornographic context then its ridiculous to think that one might be constrained from referring to sexual acts or attributes within a music form that has sex as part of its foundation. If the killjoys of the world were to succeed in taking the sex out of rock and roll there wouldn’t be much left, and they’d be straight after the next thing in line – drugs for example, or violence, or political expression. If political correctness ever goes too far rock and roll may have to go underground, wouldn’t that be fun? As Ozzy Osbourne said, ‘You can’t kill rock and roll, it’s here to stay’.

Ok, lets lighten up a bit. What is your favourite band of all time and why?

The Rolling Stones, because they’ve had all the aces. Master craftsmen of blues, rock ‘n’ roll, country rock & ballads, great musicians & performers, they’ve pushed the boundaries at times, they’ve had longevity - ‘Soul Survivors’ I guess you could say, and they reflect the spirit of rock ‘n’ roll and all that has been good and bad about it - they’re the yin and the yang.

Do you have a favourite sports team?

I follow The Hawks, the Hawthorn Football Club in the Australian Football League, and have been lucky to be alive during several successful periods for the club. They pride themselves on being a family club, play for the team, and use the motto ‘one for all and all for one’.

If you could get on the stage with anyone dead or alive, who would it be?

My deceased friend, James Harrison. I loved sharing the stage with him and his band Friendly Fire, he was an exceptional songwriter, performer, and a soulful singer. It’s a tragedy that he wasn’t discovered and celebrated by the wider world. I carry his songs in my heart and would love to be on stage with him again. Maybe we’ll jam it up when I get to ‘the great gig in the sky’.

This is your shot to let loose. Throw down your biggest complaint about the music biz.

I just feel that compared to the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s, many fans, not all fans, but many fans at concerts these days aren’t physically connecting with live music as much, not getting into that rock ‘n’ roll trance or ‘zone’, not gelling with the music as much because of mobile phone technology. I think its sad when large numbers of fans are present at a gig but still choose to stand still and view the concert at times through their phone, via a filter. I was guilty of it too once when I first got a mobile phone and all the images I took were generally crap and I don’t look back at them. I think fans prone to using mobiles at concerts would enjoy themselves more if they’d move to the music and inter-react more with the band. Imagine Slade’s recording of “Know Who You Are” from the live album ‘Slade Alive’ if you didn’t have all those hands clapping, if half the audience had cameras in their hands, it wouldn’t have that magic. There’s a oneness that can be achieved between a band and an audience when a gig is really rocking and I just feel that all those distracted fans that are filming these days instead of living in the moment can hinder that from happening.

Thursday, May 16, 2019

ARSHENIC Release New Single & Official Video 'Dear Remorse'

From the album: Final Collision
Released by: Sliptrick Records 15.05.19
Format: Online Single/Official Video
Genre: Rock/Metal | Alternative Metal
Get it now from: iTunes & more
Listen to Dear Remorse on: Spotify
Dear Remorse is a music video from Arshenic’s forthcoming album Final Collision. The song has a doom-gothic aesthetic with female lead vocals, background screams and symphonic nuances.
The story behind the clip is referring to relationships between people living in their physical bodies and other non-physical entities like ghosts, angels or demons, presences of which all of us may sometimes experience. It also can be seen as a expression of loss, despair and abandonment when someone close to us disappears from our life.
Final Collision | Released August 20th 2019 via Sliptrick Records
Arshenic are:
Oliwia Bartuś-Staszak „Ofilia” – Vocal/Lyrics | Włodzimierz Czuba „Vlad” – Electric Guitar | Marek Turło – Bass Guitar | Bartosz Staszak – Drums


Wednesday, May 15, 2019

MCCUIN INTERVIEW

1.Introduce yourself and your band and tell us why we should listen to you. Dale:  Guitar Angie:  Drums Greg:  Lead Vocal, Keyboard Chris:  Guitar, Background Vocals J. Ray:  Bass, Background Vocals We love our music, and what we do.  We hope others do too.  We truly do what we do, from the heart.

2.What do you classify your sound as, Who do you tell people you sound like?


 Hard Rock.  We're just a high energy, fun band.  We hope we have a unique sound.

3.With digital music in today's world would you vote to keep or eliminate physical media? 


Keep.  It's great signable merchandise.

4.What is the reason you decided to be a musician and has that reason paid off?



The decision to be a musician is easy, it's what we love and who we are.  The payoff emotionally is immense, monetarily never enough.

5.How do you feel about females in metal getting special attention? Do you feel it is fair?


 Everyone tries for attention any way they can, it's the business we're in.  Men whining about the success of women, while in a male dominated business, is awfully petty

6.In the world climate with hatred being at an all time high and metal being an “ angry” music   Do you think your music contributes to anger and hatred? 


 
I don't know how you have quantified the “hatred being at an all time high” part of the question, statistically, violence worldwide is at an all time low.  That being said, if the metal you listen to is angry, kudos!  Humanity is so much better off if humans work out their aggression through art instead of by violence.

7.Are you opposed to religious beliefs or politics being used in music?


 No, every artist uses whatever is inside them to create their art.  Religion or politics hasn't been a part of McCuin's music.

8.We have dive into some pretty deep issues here do you think your music sends a message and if so what is it? 


Yes, come out and see our show and you'll have a great time for an evening, buy our music and you'll have a great time for the rest of your life.  This is our message.


 

9.The market has changed and many bands believe that record labels are a thing of the past, with many labels now charging bands to “sign” how do you think a band can make it in todays scene? 

Like any other business we have to work smart, work hard, and make good decisions.  Persistence pays off.

10.Why with the thousands of options including netflix , sporting events everything on demand     Why do you think people should take the time to listen to what you have to say in your music?


 All we can do is do what we do.  We don't write songs thinking what would please the most people.  We write songs that we love and are passionate about, and believe there's someone out there that feels the same way.  If there is someone who is touched by the music we write, that is the ulimate compliment.

11.How do you feel about pay to play?


  
Do you think it is fair for a band to have to pay money to play? 

Don't like it.  I've never gone into a restaurant and had the restaurant pay all it's customers to eat lunch.

12.It is fact that you are the talent and the entertainment.  Explain what you think is the most important key to success? 


Again, like any other business we have to work smart, work hard, and make good decisions.  Persistence pays off.


13.In country music and even in some cases rock music is written and performed by different people would your band perform a song written by someone else?


 Yes, and other artists are welcome to perform our songs.

14.If you are pro female in music are you pro using sex to sell your music? 


Those are two different issues.  We are pro female.  If sex is used to sell anyone's music, or any other product, that's fine too.

15.What is your view on the lawsuits against people saying lewd or unprofessional things to women or men and how does that affect an art described as sex drugs and rock n roll ?


 Lawsuits against anyone saying what someone feels is lewd or unprofessional, is the height of stupidity.  Let everyone have their say, you're not forced to purchase it.

16. Ok lets lighten up a bit. What is your favorite band of all time and why? 


Well, that would have to be McCuin.

17.What would you be doing if you were not in a band?


 Still playing music.

18. Do you have a favorite sports team? 


Yes.

 

19.If you could get on stage with anyone dead or alive who would it be?

 It would be the alive one.  Being on stage with the dead one is a little creepy.

20.This is your shot to let loose, Throw down your biggest complaint about the music biz


 It's hard for us to whine about the business that's been good to us.  It's been an honor to have people who are willing to listen and support what we do.  Thank you to ALL of the fans!

Employed To Serve DAMN I LOVE THIS BAND!

Few would have predicted that the future of heavy music would emerge from Woking, a small commuter town buried in the Surrey countryside on the outskirts of London.

But the release of Employed To Serve’s second album, The Warmth of a Dying Sun,thrust the metallic hardcore quintet squarely into the spotlight, garnering across-the-board praise, with Kerrang!, Metal Hammer, The Radio 1 Rock Show, Metal Injection, Punktastic, That’s Not Metal, The Independent and more all showing strong support.

‘The  Warmth of a Dying Sun’was also voted Kerrang!’s ‘Album Of The Year’ for 2017, an illustrious accolade that has previously been won by some of metal music’s foremost names…

So what do you do? What’s the logical next step once you’ve achieved this level of breakout status?

With Eternal Forward Motion, Employed To Serve have chosen to sharpen their impact, to refine those signature elements that made them so revered in the first place – the groovy licks, the frenetic counter-rhythms, the searing discordant leads, the melodic detours and the sick heavy head-banging riffs.

Like its predecessor, Eternal Forward Motion is stuffed full of vocal & guitar hooks, yet never compromises its inherent heavy ideals. It’s the same approach that allowed Pantera to unrepentantly bust down mainstream walls in such an unruly, hard-lined fashion in the mid-’90s, updated spectacularly here for today’s more liberally-minded 21stcentury metal fan.
Simply, Eternal Forward Motion takes as much influence from alternative metal heroes Deftones or Will Havenas it does from the more sonically brutal palettes of Carcass or Converge.

Across 11 uncompromising tracks, Eternal Forward Motion explores our place within a society that is constantly shifting and moving ahead. Finding constant contentment in such a fast-paced world is an impossible dream, yet one we all strive for despite the difficulties involved. This album examines both the fortitude of the human spirit in trying to seek eternal happiness as well as the obstacles that are perpetually thrust in our way, be they related to mental health issues or the degree of FOMO (‘fear of missing out’) propagated by social media.

Employed To Serve’s origins are essentially grassroots, with the core duo of Justine Jones (vocals) and Sammy Urwin (guitar / vocals) initially starting the band as a two-piece grindcore project backed by a drum machine.

Experiences on the UK festival scene in 2012 expanded their horizons and perceptions of what weightier music could be. Seeing heavy-hitters such as Converge, Meshuggah and Glassjaw alongside smaller but no less important acts like Rolo Tomassi, Norma Jean, Veils and The Chariot inspired the duo to develop their vision.

2014 EP Change Nothing Regret Everything operated as a stepping stone into full band territory, before 2015’s critically acclaimed debut album, Greyer Than You Remember,became their calling card, followed up two years later by the aforementioned The Warmth of a Dying Sun. 
Employed To Serve have already proved themselves as a searingly intense and honest live experience, sharing bills with the cream of the crop of modern heavy music, including Code Orange, Stick To Your Guns, Counterparts & Underoath. They’ve also decimated stages at some of the UK & Europe’s leading music festivals, the likes of Download, Lowlands, Graspop & With Full Force, and there’s an appearance at Hellfest confirmed for this year.

Armed with fresh material and the new-found worldwide support of Spinefarm Records, it seems inevitable that Employed To Serve will take their place on the international stage as a metal act who can truly make a difference.

SAVOR THE SILENCE

Savor the Silence is a Punk/Rock band, founded by members of The Hate Game and Before the Crash.
Band Members
Chris Waldron: Guitar, Vocals
Chris Bemis: Bass, Vocals
Pete Clement: Drums


This is high impact for radio / press now!! request for interviews can be set up by emailing metalcoffefpr@gmail.com as well as request for music or any other info you need.

 

McCuin Joins Metal Coffee

McCuin Band dominates kick ass rock! Professional musicians and songwriters who deliver high energy stage shows.
McCuin Band began in 2003.  They are four individual recording artists with a passion for music, and a passion for live shows.  Their energy and craftsmanship continue to excite audiences wherever they play.
McCuin has opened for Warrant, Jackyl, Nigel Dupre, Foghat, Joan Jett, and many others.  They've played at the Whiskey a Go-Go, resulting in an invite to play at 2011 CrueFest, and Rocklahoma, and an invite to come back to the Whiskey in the future.
Now, after a seven year hiatus, McCuin Band hits the road again with it’s brand of adrenaline fueled rock, along with a new release of their fourth album, Moment Of Clarity, in 2019!
About the Magic:
   

McCuin Band has done countless benefits and fundraisers (Make a Wish Foundation) (American Cancer Society) in their ongoing fight against cancer. 2009-2010 they did the “Save a Life Tour” as part of the crusade to help funding and research for 13-year-old Makenna Renard who ultimately lost her battle with adult leukemia.  McCuin Band was awarded the 2011 “Honor Band” by Arkansas Rockstar Magazine.

Greg McCuin
Chris "The Man" Moran
Dale "Slinky" Qualls
Jay White
Angie Crow


This is high impact for radio / press now!! request for interviews can be set up by emailing metalcoffefpr@gmail.com as well as request for music or any other info you need.
 

ALMOST HUMAN JOIN METAL COFFEE

Initially raised in the 90’s by Olivier Perdrizat (guitar) & Rosario Fullone (drums), Almøst Human splitted a few years later before to born again – on the ashes of the previous band – in 2008 when Jan Peyer joined his “new” co-conspirators. Then officially reactivated, Almøst Human, recruited two new members, Chris Matthey (guitar) and Ben Plüss (vocals) with the faim to find its propre musical way.
So their music is constantly evolving between rage and introspection, peace and violence, breaking the “clichés” of the metal cultures to ask themselves about the nature of the human being next to the animal reign.
 

Aſter debut and self-produced EP "Ø", Almøst Human played inside and outside the swiss borders and was part of the Silence festival in Nepal next to major bands such as Textures. Then they worked with with the team of the "120 secondes" TV comedy show for the national tv, writing and recording some tunes of a parody band called "Black Lion Genocide" with which one they played @ Paléo Festival in 2015.
About one year and a half later and the arrival of the new guitarist   Gilles Bonzon (Abstract Reason, Buried Skies) - Chris Matthey keeping the hand of the music production of the band - Almøst Human began to record its first full-length album "XS2XTC", to be released during winter 2018/2019.

 This is high impact for radio / press now!! request for interviews can be set up by emailing metalcoffefpr@gmail.com as well as request for music or any other info you need.